Japan: Weekend Homestay

Leah Corbett, a 4th year Japanese major, spent the spring semester studying on the JF Oberlin University: Reconnaissance Japan Program in Tokyo. Read about her homestay experience below, check our her own blog at https://leahandjapan.wordpress.com/, and watch her “daily snapshot” video at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sLN6dASZnU4.

This past weekend, I did a two-day, one-night homestay. I and another student from India, Gopi, stayed at the home of a woman, Takahashi-san, who works at Oberlin. I remember when I first signed up to do a homestay through Oberlin’s Office of International Programs, the vision that automatically came to my mind was staying with a nuclear family – I think that’s the typical vision – so I was a little surprised when I got the notification that I would be staying with one person. However, I think it brings up an important point, which is that not everyone lives in that style of household. I think it turned out to be an enjoyable experience for all three of us!

We met up on Saturday morning, and then went shopping for food. Gopi and I are both vegetarian, and Takahashi-san was very thoughtful in making sure we would have a good choice of food during our time with her. We even stopped by a Japanese sweets store and picked out something for each of us.

This is a flower made of sweet bean paste which I got at the sweets shop. It was almost too pretty to eat.

Once we got settled in at her place, Takahashi-san began preparing ingredients for making vegetable sushi rolls. Since I’ve been in Japan, I have not yet been able to eat any kind of sushi here because veggie rolls aren’t a normal thing that is sold here, like they sometimes are in the U.S., so I was excited to be able to eat some and experiment with fillings. She cut the nori (seaweed) into smaller sections so we could make lots of individual rolls with different ingredients.

If you look closely, there are two tiny dollops of wasabi in this roll. I was scared of trying any more than that.

Later that day, we went to a piano performance, which Gopi had been invited to. It was rainy and we had to take the train a little ways to get there, but it was relaxing and a nice evening excursion for us.

The next day for a midday snack, Gopi showed us how to make chapati, a type of flatbread from India. We ate it along with a mango pickle which she brought with her to Japan.

All in all, it was a cool experience because there was cultural exchange going more than one way, with us eating both Japanese and Indian food during our time there. It was an enriching experience which especially demonstrated just how important food is in the varying cultures in the world. I’m glad I decided to try out a homestay!

Advertisements

À Table!

Lillian Harris is a Third Year, majoring in Art History, who is attending the Fall 2017 UVA in Lyon program. 

Since arriving in Lyon three weeks ago, I’ve come to associate this phrase – which means “dinner’s served” – with all things that are good:

  1. The comfort of a home-cooked meal after a long day à la fac (slang for “at university”)
  2. Hours of banter with my host family in French… and the occasional miming (due to language barrier!)
  3. And *most importantly* lots of cheese

I knew that food was important to the French. I read online that Lyon is considered the capital gastronomique de l’Europe. And my host family even mentioned in an email one time this summer that their meals usually last at least two hours. So I should have been prepared for this pomp and circumstance of the French dîner.

But I don’t think I realized all of this – the sanctity of mealtime, the relevance of the kitchen table, and the nuances of the French dining experience – until I got here and was christened on my first night at approximately 9pm with the resounding call of « à table ! »

That first meal was a blur of floofy soufflé and and lots of butter and some stinky cheese that I couldn’t catch the name of.  I was nervous, having just met my host family, and wanted to make a good first impression; but I threw polite nibbles out the window and ate so much not only because it was 9pm (at home I usually eat around 6:30), but also because the food was good. Dinner lasted until I couldn’t keep my jetlagged eyes open any longer, and then I went to bed feeling stuffed and bien acceuillie (welcomed).

The transition from American everyday life to the French mode de vie has been interesting and tough and funny and overwhelming (more details later), but luckily I was able to cling to some common ground – a taste for la gastronomie – as soon as I got here. So I’m going to continue eating my freshly baked baguettes and pain au chocolat and any other bread/cheese/chocolate combinations I can find until I get the full lay of the land.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Special Introductions to Florence

Sarah Genovese is a Foreign Affairs major, who went to Florence, Italy in Spring 2017 during her third year.

I can’t believe what a whirl the first 11 days in Florence have been. It feels as though I have been here for 10 minutes, but also for 3 years. I am beginning to have a sense that I am in “my neighborhood” as I approach my apartment at the end of long walks. I am getting lost slightly less often, though I have never been particularly good at directions (and still get lost in my hometown). I have faced a few obstacles: the hot water in our apartment shut off one day; my debit card is scratched and a new one is (hopefully) on its way. “Our apartment.” I share an apartment with 8 girls: 4 from UVA and 4 from Penn State. Everyone is very nice and very compatible—it turns out that college age girls with an interest in travelling Europe for four months have a lot in common.

Our first weekend here was full of school orientations, and less formal means of orienting ourselves in Florence. My personal favorite part of the first few days wa going to an aperitivo, a cheap “pre-dinner snack,” buffet-style and served with a drink. It was a cultural experience, very revealing of the slow-paced, food-oriented Italian lifestyle. It was also a lot of fun to do with my apartment-mates. It’s been a continuous, conscious effort to avoid the “study abroad bars” and “American diners” that study abroad students here tend to frequent, and make sure that I’m doing culturally engaging things with my study abroad friends.

This weekend, two of my apartment-mates went to Berlin, and three of us went to Siena. Siena was a beautiful town—we went to the Siena Duomo, a medieval art museum, and Il Campo, the city square. We had lunch at a highly recommended restaurant, L’Osteria on Via Rossi, and I had Siena’s traditional pasta with a wild boar ragu, which is a Siena staple as well. Engaging with Italy via food has definitely been one of my preferred modes.

Sunday of this weekend, I went to a church service at the nearest cathedral which, like all of the churches in Florence, is amazingly beautiful. I am a confirmed Catholic, but hadn’t been to church in a while. The contrast between the strange language and the childhood memories gave me a mix of emotions that was hard to sort out, but which draws me to go again. However, my plans for many long weekend trips may disrupt this desire. Indeed, the hardest part of study abroad so far has been trying to establish a balance between all of the things I want to do in Florence and Italy, and the things I want to do in wider Europe. I look forward to figuring it out!

UVA Exchange: Seoul National University

Elizabeth Kim is an Economics major, who attended the Spring 2017 UVA Exchange: Seoul National University Program in her third year.

This is a picture of the streets of Hongdae. It’s always so crowded, especially when there are street performers like in the picture! You can’t really tell who is the performer because the crowd is so huge! There is always one section of the road in Hongdae where there are many street performs dancing to or singing popular Korean pop songs. I thought it was interesting that in the U.S., many street performers are also asking for money, but here it is a lot of young people that want to show off their talents.

As exchange students, we are part of a program called SNU Buddy where we are put in groups with Korean students who help us get settled and create group events. One event was to have our own jangteo called International Food Day. It was the biggest jangteo on campus, as seen in the picture! Students from many different countries cooked two dishes from their country that could sell a lot. I participated as well on the U.S. team and we decided to make chili and fried Oreos. The fried Oreos sold really well because many Koreans hadn’t seen it before and they all said it was a food that they would expect to come from the U.S. because it was fried and would have very many calories.

From April 27 to May 7 is the Lotus Lantern Festival to celebrate Buddha’s birthday, which is on May 3. These are some of the lanterns that were put up at Bongeunsa Temple in Gangnam. It’s always cool to see historical monuments tucked away in the huge city of Seoul. The lanterns were so pretty to look at.

Lotte World at night was very pretty. This is a part of the portion of the park that is outdoors. I thought it resembled the castle at Disneyworld! Its interesting one company, like Lotte, that can be involved in so many things. For example, Lotte runs this amusement park but also many department stores, fast food restaurants, hotels, and many more.

This is the cherry blossom festival in the beginning of April. Though there are many cherry blossoms all around Korea, one of the popular places to go see them is at Seokchon Lake, where this picture was taken. I submitted this picture because you can see how crowded it was! Afterwards, I could understand why everyone wanted to go see the cherry blossoms – they’re only in bloom for about 1 – 2 weeks.

More street food in Hongdae!! There are always so many street food trucks and it’s tempting to stop at each one. There are especially many in Hongdae because it is a very popular location for young people to go to eat, drink, and shop. Here, my friend and I are eating fried dumplings and the vendor is also selling tteokbokki (spicy rice cake) and odeng (fish cake).

India photo blog 2

Sarah Romanus is a Global Studies major who spent the spring semester in Pune, India, participating in The Alliance: Contemporary India- Development, Economy, Society program.

This photo is taken on the day of Holi in India at an all-inclusive school within the city. This school accepts all students regardless of any type of disability. We arrived early in the morning and helped to make natural color from beetroot and spinach, which would be used later to throw at each other. Holi is the festival of color and it definitely got colorful! I really liked this picture because I feel it captured the fun spirit of the day as we all danced and threw colors together. Many of the students were eager to show us their dance moves as the songs changed to some of their favorite Hindi music.

We had the wonderful opportunity to attend an Indian wedding during our time in Pune. One of the daughters of one of the host families was getting married, and the entire program was invited to attend. Our host families all took us out shopping to get appropriate wedding attire such as saris and lenghas. It is also common to get mehendi (what we call henna) right before the wedding, so we all got this done the day before. This photo is of the mehendi on my hands for the wedding. The bride will typically have mehendi all the way up to her elbows as well as on her feet.

This is a picture I took during the dinner preparation in my homestay. We were making my favorite dish I have had so far in India, chaat. This specific type of chaat is called bhel puri. This dish is much different than most Indian food we have had in the homestay because it is not eaten with chapatti. It was a wonderful experience learning how to make this dish alongside my host mom and sister.

During the semester I took a class called Gender in Indian Media. This class focused on gender issues in India today as well as the way in which the media portrays these issues. During the class we had a field visit to a transgender community in Pune. Here, we got to learn about the structure of the community and what it is like living as a trans person in India. Pictured here are the Gods this community worships everyday. These Gods are commonly worshiped by the trans community in India so they were unique from others we had seen before.

This photo was taken at on a rural site visit for our public health class. During this visit we spoke with a doctor from the clinic about the role the clinic has played in the community as well as the role the community has made in maintaining the clinic. Many people now are employed at the clinic and a nursing program as begun to train local staff. This clinic is funded solely from non-governmental sources.

I had not seen many monkeys until I traveled to Hampi on a weekend trip. The rock where this photo was taken is part of a grouping of rocks atop which a temple for the God Hanuman, the monkey God, sits. The temple and surrounding rocks are filled with wild monkeys that like to steal food and water from visitors or eat what is left behind. This is one of the monkeys keeping its distance from the people watching the sunset.

This picture is from a local fish market we visited in a town called Dapoli. This fish market happens every morning. There are hundreds of boats that crowd the water close to the shore, bringing the night’s catch into shore. A person with a cart pulled by cattle brings the heavy loads of fish to shore where the fish are sold.

Q&A with UVA Alumna and Travel Blogger

Check out this Q&A from UVA Today with alumna Heather Mason, who moved to South Africa and developed a career as a travel blogger and writer.

https://news.virginia.edu/content/qa-8-questions-alumna-and-travel-blogger-heather-mason?utm_source=DailyReport&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=news

 

Mason’s photo of her adopted hometown, Johannesburg

Mason recently sampled the food and wine of South Africa’s famed Stellenbosch wine region