India photo blog 2

Sarah Romanus is a Global Studies major who spent the spring semester in Pune, India, participating in The Alliance: Contemporary India- Development, Economy, Society program.

This photo is taken on the day of Holi in India at an all-inclusive school within the city. This school accepts all students regardless of any type of disability. We arrived early in the morning and helped to make natural color from beetroot and spinach, which would be used later to throw at each other. Holi is the festival of color and it definitely got colorful! I really liked this picture because I feel it captured the fun spirit of the day as we all danced and threw colors together. Many of the students were eager to show us their dance moves as the songs changed to some of their favorite Hindi music.

We had the wonderful opportunity to attend an Indian wedding during our time in Pune. One of the daughters of one of the host families was getting married, and the entire program was invited to attend. Our host families all took us out shopping to get appropriate wedding attire such as saris and lenghas. It is also common to get mehendi (what we call henna) right before the wedding, so we all got this done the day before. This photo is of the mehendi on my hands for the wedding. The bride will typically have mehendi all the way up to her elbows as well as on her feet.

This is a picture I took during the dinner preparation in my homestay. We were making my favorite dish I have had so far in India, chaat. This specific type of chaat is called bhel puri. This dish is much different than most Indian food we have had in the homestay because it is not eaten with chapatti. It was a wonderful experience learning how to make this dish alongside my host mom and sister.

During the semester I took a class called Gender in Indian Media. This class focused on gender issues in India today as well as the way in which the media portrays these issues. During the class we had a field visit to a transgender community in Pune. Here, we got to learn about the structure of the community and what it is like living as a trans person in India. Pictured here are the Gods this community worships everyday. These Gods are commonly worshiped by the trans community in India so they were unique from others we had seen before.

This photo was taken at on a rural site visit for our public health class. During this visit we spoke with a doctor from the clinic about the role the clinic has played in the community as well as the role the community has made in maintaining the clinic. Many people now are employed at the clinic and a nursing program as begun to train local staff. This clinic is funded solely from non-governmental sources.

I had not seen many monkeys until I traveled to Hampi on a weekend trip. The rock where this photo was taken is part of a grouping of rocks atop which a temple for the God Hanuman, the monkey God, sits. The temple and surrounding rocks are filled with wild monkeys that like to steal food and water from visitors or eat what is left behind. This is one of the monkeys keeping its distance from the people watching the sunset.

This picture is from a local fish market we visited in a town called Dapoli. This fish market happens every morning. There are hundreds of boats that crowd the water close to the shore, bringing the night’s catch into shore. A person with a cart pulled by cattle brings the heavy loads of fish to shore where the fish are sold.

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A glimpse of Guatemala

Sandy Hoang is a 1st year student in the College of Arts and Sciences studying abroad on the UVA in Guatemala: Engineering Public Health program. Check out some of her beautiful pictures of Guatemala and thoughtful reflections that go with them!

A Mayan woman carrying firewood on her head makes the difficult hike through the hilly plantation with her son. In the rural indigenous villages, it is the woman’s duty to collect and carry the firewood to her home, where she uses the wood to cook. Work in Guatemala is often gender-divided, with women working at home and men working on the fincas, or plantations.

A Mayan woman carrying firewood on her head makes the difficult hike through the hilly plantation with her son. In the rural indigenous villages, it is the woman’s duty to collect and carry the firewood to her home, where she uses the wood to cook. Work in Guatemala is often gender-divided, with women working at home and men working on the fincas, or plantations.

In the market, women display and sell their traje weavings. Traje is woven using traditional methods taught in Mayan culture for hundreds of years. With creative and meticulous detail from the weaver, traje is considered a powerful art in Guatemala. Each traje takes around two months to finish and each village has a unique traje design.

In the market, women display and sell their traje weavings. Traje is woven using traditional methods taught in Mayan culture for hundreds of years. With creative and meticulous detail from the weaver, traje is considered a powerful art in Guatemala. Each traje takes around two months to finish and each village has a unique traje design.

Washing clothes in the lake is not only a burden because of a walk, especially with the weight of wet clothes, but it also damages the lake because of the detergents and bleach that are used in the process. These pilas offer an environmentally and personally safe alternative to washing clothes in the lake, and was created by the San Lucas Toliman Mission as a way to improve the health of women.

Washing clothes in the lake is not only a burden because of a walk, especially with the weight of wet clothes, but it also damages the lake because of the detergents and bleach that are used in the process. These pilas offer an environmentally and personally safe alternative to washing clothes in the lake, and was created by the San Lucas Toliman Mission as a way to improve the health of women.

Before the Spanish conquest in the sixteenth century, Mayans lived in tight-knit communities. These ruins cue back to the grand architecture of this time, where hundreds of people would live in each square of land. The communities would often feud against each other and cautions were taken to prevent sabotage. These seemingly ancient communities persisted up until the sixteenth century and show how important Mayan identity still is in Guatemalan culture.

Before the Spanish conquest in the sixteenth century, Mayans lived in tight-knit communities. These ruins cue back to the grand architecture of this time, where hundreds of people would live in each square of land. The communities would often feud against each other and cautions were taken to prevent sabotage. These seemingly ancient communities persisted up until the sixteenth century and show how important Mayan identity still is in Guatemalan culture.

Many men and women gather in the center of Xela to buy fruits and vegetables grown by their neighbors. With rich soil and ideal weather, agriculture happily continues to be a huge source of  income in Guatemala. I was immediately reminded of the issue between the US and Guatemala during the United Fruit Company crisis in the early 1950s, when the US exploited Guatemalan  land and government for the growth of the US-owned fruit business in Guatemala. Guatemala is  a land filled with agricultural potential, as well as agricultural exploitation.

Many men and women gather in the center of Xela to buy fruits and vegetables grown by their neighbors. With rich soil and ideal weather, agriculture happily continues to be a huge source of income in Guatemala. I was immediately reminded of the issue between the US and Guatemala during the United Fruit Company crisis in the early 1950s, when the US exploited Guatemalan land and government for the growth of the US-owned fruit business in Guatemala. Guatemala is a land filled with agricultural potential, as well as agricultural exploitation.

At the crater of Volcano Chikabal is a sacred lagoon, where Mayans offer flowers and prayers to the god of the rain for better crops. While I was there, I also stumbled upon a Mayan ritual, which consisted of chants from the Mayans and a large fire. I was surprised at the persistence of Mayan culture and identity despite Western influences from the Spaniards and the US.

At the crater of Volcano Chikabal is a sacred lagoon, where Mayans offer flowers and prayers to the god of the rain for better crops. While I was there, I also stumbled upon a Mayan ritual, which consisted of chants from the Mayans and a large fire. I was surprised at the persistence of Mayan culture and identity despite Western influences from the Spaniards and the US.

This manually-operated hydroelectric plant offers a modest number of megawatts for a portion of the villages in the outskirts of Xela. Although the supervisor of the plant has requested to the municipality of Xela the use of automated machines to power the plant, the government denied his offer in favor of more jobs, since the cost of automated machines far exceeds the cost of workers. Before seeing the plant, I expected to see a large Hoover dam, and was surprised to see how small the plant actually was.

This manually-operated hydroelectric plant offers a modest number of megawatts for a portion of the villages in the outskirts of Xela. Although the supervisor of the plant has requested to the municipality of Xela the use of automated machines to power the plant, the government denied his offer in favor of more jobs, since the cost of automated machines far exceeds the cost of workers. Before seeing the plant, I expected to see a large Hoover dam, and was surprised to see how small the plant actually was.

Unlike in USA cemeteries, Guatemalan graves are above ground because of the high water levels underground due to the rainy season and the lake. Death in Guatemala is viewed not with so much solemnity as in the US, but, rather, with a sort of celebration of their passed ancestors and their reunion with Christ. The bright colors and the detailed architecture attest to this attitude with the dead.

Unlike in USA cemeteries, Guatemalan graves are above ground because of the high water levels underground due to the rainy season and the lake. Death in Guatemala is viewed not with so much solemnity as in the US, but, rather, with a sort of celebration of their passed ancestors and their reunion with Christ. The bright colors and the detailed architecture attest to this attitude with the dead.

Lake Atitlan, surrounded by three large volcanoes, is the home of many indigenous villages such as San Martin, San Lucas Toliman, and Santiago. The lake is a source of drinking water,  bathing water, and washing water. Over the years, the lake has been a popular visit for tourists,  and the indigenous population has adapted to this interest with markets and stores that has  transformed the lives of the Mayans. Increasing pollution of the lake has also created problems in  the indigenous health, and many NGOs have tried to combat this solution.

Lake Atitlan, surrounded by three large volcanoes, is the home of many indigenous villages such as San Martin, San Lucas Toliman, and Santiago. The lake is a source of drinking water, bathing water, and washing water. Over the years, the lake has been a popular visit for tourists, and the indigenous population has adapted to this interest with markets and stores that has transformed the lives of the Mayans. Increasing pollution of the lake has also created problems in the indigenous health, and many NGOs have tried to combat this solution.