Sights from Jordan

Emmaline Herring is a second year who studied abroad in Jordan in the Fall of 2017. She participated in a course studying Geopolitics, International Relations, and the Future of the Middle East.

A pastel partition

One of the little buildings we stayed in during our week in northern Jordan

People from across the world come to this ancient religious site to leave prayer ties to this tree
From the roof of Ajloun Castle in Northern Jordan, Syria and Palestine can be seen in the distance
Ancient columns still stand at attention atop a hill in Jerash
A horse carriage pulled a friend, who recently broke her foot, to the ancient city, and lapped us in the process
The Treasury awaits just behind the surrounding canyons
Worn, carved building facades blaze orange in the sunlight
A view of Amman taken opposite the British embassy
An assortment of reading materials atop the best bookshelf around
A friendly game unfolds in front of this picturesque café on Rainbow Street

 

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Climbing Mt. Fuji

Chandler Collins is a 2nd Year student in the College of Arts and Sciences. He is attending the UVA Exchange: Hitotsubashi University program this semester.

We took an early morning bus to Mt. Fuji’s Yoshida-Subaru 5th Station, a small simulacrum of a Japanese city perched 2,000m into the clouds, where we began the 7-hour ascent to the summit. Since Mt. Fuji is a volcano, there is no foliage at the summit to block the harsh sub-freezing winds from sapping our body’s heat. We huddled together on the rocky ground and waited as the sun rose through the clouds and over Kawaguchiko, the small town below Fuji-san. In this image, Keelyn McCabe braces against the cold wind and attempts to steady our UVA (pronounced Baa-ji-ni-ya in my broken Japanese) flag against the sub-freezing winds. An old Japanese adage rings true, “Only a fool goes to Japan and doesn’t climb Mt. Fuji. An even bigger fool climbs it twice.”
Pictured is my completed “Mt. Fuji Stick,” a 2 ft. long wooden stick which climbers get branded at each mountain hut along the ascent up the mountain. Each hut has a unique brand, marking the name of the mountain hut/station.
After the sun rose, we began the 1500m descent over a 6km trail dusted with volcanic ash which bored its way into our clothing and gnaw on our feet with each new step. In this image, we’d yet to descend through the clouds. [L to R: Gabriel Aguto, Blaise Sevier, Keelyn McCabe]

 

Additionally, Collin has created a travel video to recap his adventures, you can find one for Mt. Fuji here (https://youtu.be/Co2nKR_b7GA)

Katin’s South Korea Photo Blog

Katin Tran is currently studying abroad in Seoul, South Korea. She is a 3rd year Computer Science and Linguistics major. Take a look at her photos thus far!

 

 

The main entrance to the Namsangol Hanok Folk Village. Namsan Park, located in the center of Seoul, has many entry points, including this grand gate that opens up to an array of traditional-style buildings.

The main performance stage of Namsangol Hanok Folk Village. Large folk and traditional performances are held on this stage as the stage and its surrounding area are both spacious and wide. When not in use, anyone can walk around it and also lounge in the structure behind it. Make sure to take your shoes off first!

Entrance to Seoul’s Thousand Year Time Capsule. Located in the Namsangol Hanok Village, this time capsule was buried in 1994 to commemorate Seoul’s 600 year anniversary as the country’s capital city. The capsule itself is buried in an open space, but that space is enclosed within elevated walls and fences. To reach the capsule, one must walk down stone pathways.

Wall inscriptions about the Thousand Year Time Capsule. The inscriptions lie directly across from the entrance to the capsule and are inscribed in both Korean and English, a plus for international tourists! The capsule’s name comes from its future opening in one thousand years from its date of burial, and inside the capsule lies 600 chosen representative cultural items.

The entrance to Jogyesa temple in central Seoul. The temple is conveniently located in the middle of the city, making it very accessible to those coming to and from work. As such, the temple is very popular and full of people, even on weekdays. The temple is currently adorned with colorful lanterns in preparation for Buddha’s birthday.

The Great Hero Hall of Jogyesa. As the central building on the temple grounds, the elevated hall serves as the primary meditation space. The outside walls, as well as the inside ones, are decorated with murals of important moments in the Buddhist religion.

Central altar in the Great Hero Hall at Jogyesa. Gigantic in size, the three-set of Buddhas on the central altar are atypically larger than most of the statues found at temples. The overwhelming size provides a larger sense of presence and can make meditators feel mentally closer to Buddha. Worshippers will often provide donations in a box to the side of the altar or provide food offerings on the altar.

Guten Tag from Braunschweig and Berlin!

Kelly Miller is a 1st year, Biomedical Engineering Student studying on the UVA Engineering in Germany: Global Ingenuity 21 program.

This is one of the largest Catholic Churches in Berlin. Surrounded by a large lawn where people gather and hang out when the weather is nice, the bells begin ringing 5 minutes before the hour and fill the air with the ringing. The picture depicts the beautiful sun set behind the towering steeples

This is one of the largest Catholic Churches in Berlin. Surrounded by a large lawn where people gather and hang out when the weather is nice, the bells begin ringing 5 minutes before the hour and fill the air with the ringing. The picture depicts the beautiful sun set behind the towering steeples

The iconic gate and entrance to the city is topped by the victory statue, at first meant to symbolize freedom but after WWII, symbolizes victory to the city.

The iconic gate and entrance to the city is topped by the victory statue, at first meant to symbolize freedom but after WWII, symbolizes victory to the city.

A church that had to be rebuilt after bombing during WWII. The catholic church has a beautiful stained glass window.

A church that had to be rebuilt after bombing during WWII. The catholic church has a beautiful stained glass window.

This is a replica of the sign that was displayed at the border of the Russian and American sector of Berlin. Every person moving between the border had to pass through Checkpoint Charlie ( Charlie serves as the military code for C ).

This is a replica of the sign that was displayed at the border of the Russian and American sector of Berlin. Every person moving between the border had to pass through Checkpoint Charlie ( Charlie serves as the military code for C ).

During the divide of the city, the East Berlin side had different symbols for “walking” and “stopping” on the traffic lights. When the city was reunited as one, the East Berliners where very adamant about keeping the Ampelmännchen since it was a symbol of their side of the city. To this day, one can tell where they are ( West vs East ) when walking around the city based off of the walk lights.

During the divide of the city, the East Berlin side had different symbols for “walking” and “stopping” on the traffic lights. When the city was reunited as one, the East Berliners where very adamant about keeping the Ampelmännchen since it was a symbol of their side of the city. To this day, one can tell where they are ( West vs East ) when walking around the city based off of the walk lights.

The Elbe is the river that flows through Dresden. While up on the tower of the museum, the statues surrounding the church had the appearance of overlooking the river, as if protecting the city

The Elbe is the river that flows through Dresden. While up on the tower of the museum, the statues surrounding the church had the appearance of overlooking the river, as if protecting the city

At a local museum in Dresden, we were able to climb to the top of a bell tower and get a 360 degree view of the city. Though this is not a full 360 view, there are multiple churches and museums included in the shot, including the Catholic church.

At a local museum in Dresden, we were able to climb to the top of a bell tower and get a 360 degree view of the city. Though this is not a full 360 view, there are multiple churches and museums included in the shot, including the Catholic church.